Review From The Studio

"Redeployment is a military term. It means to transfer a unit from area to another" (Phil Klay 1983- )

 As I wrote in my introductory post A is for Aging Youthfully, my plans  for retirement did not include losing my husband of 30 years to cancer at age 58. We had planned tentatively that when he turned 65 and I turned 61 we would consider retirement  to travel and take up the hobbies that we had no time for with two full-time careers. 

“Winners never quit and quitters never win” (Vince Lombardi 1913 - 1970)

“ I  quit school in the sixth grade because of pneumonia. Not because I had it but because I couldn’t spell it."  (Rocky Graziano 1919-1990)

"I'm more proud of quitting smoking than of anything else I've done in my life, including winning an Oscar."  (Christine Lahti 1950 - )

The more  I thought about the topic of “quitting” the more I realized that there are many different ways of looking at it than the simple assumption that a quitter is a loser. Hence the two quotes above.  

"The most important thing is posture: when you get older its the way you stand, the way you walk, that shows it" ( Carine Roitfeld 1954 - )

As I have become more and more aware of the need to consciously remind myself of my own posture, I find myself noticing how many people walk around in a slouched state with their necks bent forward. It used to be something characteristic of older people like some of the folks I would see shuffling around on the ships when I went on dance cruises. But now I see so many young people walking, eyes fixed on their mobile phones, necks bent forward and I wonder how slumped they will be as older individuals. I have a series of exercises I work on to counteract that neck bend, derived from years of working, seated at a desk, looking down at papers or at a computer screen. 

"Freedom is the oxygen of the  soul"  (Moshe Dayan 1915-1981)

Our normal cellular metabolic processes produce reactive oxygen species. These oxygen radicals attack and damage cellular  structures. To counteract this oxidative stress our cells have internal antioxidants such as enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Trace elements (copper, iron, manganese, selenium, zinc) are integral parts of these antioxidant enzymes.

Take Care of your Body- it’s the only place you have to live”  Jim Rohn (1930 - 2009)
 
At 7 PM on a Friday night, I was wheeled into the operative recovery  room after a marathon 5 hour emergency surgery to decompress spinal stenosis, fuse vertebrae and insert a metal rod. Not even twelve hours later, a physiotherapist came into the hospital room, got me out of bed and clutching the pole of my  IV stand,  I was shuffling around the ward, murmuring the mantra she taught me, “nose over toes”.  It was movement, not rest that would stimulate the healing process, I was told.
Think in the morning. Act in the noon. Eat in the evening, Sleep in the Night. (William Blake 1757-1827)
 
Way back while I was contemplating how to touch on varied aspects of Living Young and comply with the daily letter protocol of the AtoZChallenge I came up with  several possible topics for some of the letters of the alphabet, while battling to think of something for other letters.  X and Z are the obvious problem children but I found interesting solutions for both letters.
“Tis better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all” Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892)
 
Approaching the half-way mark of my AtoZChallenge2018 journey though the roadmap of my life, with the intent of Living Young as I Grow Older, one refrain of a John Lennon Beatles’ song keeps coming into my head.  "All you need is love, love, love is all you need.”
“For anything to really change, we must first change our thinking”  (Rael Kalley)
 
I have a brother who is a life coach. Twenty-five years ago he founded his company which offers both personal and corporate coaching. I admire his many achievements. His book “Life Sinks or  Soars; The Choice is Yours", imparts valuable life lessons through his story of one man’s journey from despair to joy.  But what I most admire is his amazing ability to be consistent.
"The more you move, the more you can move."

An unusually bitingly cold wind was blowing off the water as I walked back to my apartment building after an energetic dance lesson. It was freezing outside and entering the warm lobby, I could almost feel the synovial fluid in my joints thawing like congealed olive oil taken out of the refrigerator. That’s also how I feel sometimes, getting out of bed after a good night’s sleep. I bounce out of bed full of energy and raring to go but while my muscles and joints are warming up, my first few steps resemble the Tin Man.  Except on the mornings after the days that I have three hours of dance and an hour of fast walking. Next morning I wake with no stiffness in my legs. The more you move the more you can move.,

“Seeing is not always believing” (Martin Luther King Jr. 1929-1968)
 
I admit it. I am suffering  from massive information overload. I felt bombarded from all sides with breaking news (usually bad), dire weather reports, conspiracy theories, the latest fad from some new guru, self-serving politicians or celebrities holding forth on subjects they know little about. I watched some of my friends obsessing about issues in the political scene over which they had absolutely no control or influence. In defence of my sanity I limited my TV watching to dance and cooking competitions (recorded to watch later sans commercials) and my newspaper reading to the crossword puzzle pages specially the cryptic crosswords. But I couldn’t completely escape the digital deluge without shutting down my computer and smart phone, and I need both for my work.
 

A lie can travel half way round the world while the truth is putting on its shoes (Charles Spurgeon 1834-1892 British Clergyman)

The 1957 "case report" begins - “Mr. Wright had a generalized far-advanced malignancy involving the lymph node, lymphosarcoma.” (1)  The author, Dr. Klopfer, a renowned German psychologist, presents this case report that he "received as a personal communication" from the physician (Dr. P.W.) who treated Mr. Wright. 

A friend sent me a coffee mug. The logo said “Why do you think your 5 minutes on Google trumps my 5 years of medical school” . I laughed and mentally added "and my 6 years of postgraduate training, my research doctorate and my 25 years of practice?”  But then I reflected on how generally the internet has contributed to a decline in the valuing of specialty training, academic knowledge and professional expertise. It’s not just medicine or science but in every trade or professional arena. 

“Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far.” (Thomas Jefferson 1743 -1826)

Within the last three months, three of my friends have had falls, resulting in fractures. One with depth perception issues, tripped over a step and fractured several ribs. The second slipped on a pool deck and had a fractured wrist. The third, a fit, active younger person, tripped over an unseen hazard, spraining one wrist and fracturing a carpal bone in the other.

“Genes are merely the blueprint, epigenetics is the contractor." (Bruce Lipton 1944 - )

Epigenetics is a word we are hearing a lot about these days. Epigenetics refers to changes of gene expression that are not due to changes in the DNA sequence of the gene. 

Way back when I was  first taught  about genetics in school, the focus was on Mendelian genetics, and autosomal dominant and recessive genes.

"We should consider every day lost in which we have not danced at least once” (Friederich Nietzsche 1844-1900)

I took up ballroom dancing in my sixties, after I retired. In my blue print for a rewarding and fulfilling retirement, three activities topped my list; growing my website (reviewfromthehouse.com), studying ballroom dance and ticking off destinations on my travel bucket list. Becoming a network entrepreneur, as I did 10 years later, was not even remotely on my mind at that time.

I’m an early morning person. Most days around 5:30 or 6 am, my eyes pop open and I wake from a deep, sound sleep  energized and raring to start my day. For me this happens most days, but for many people this is not their reality. They have difficulty falling asleep or they wake up more often during the night and don’t easily go back to sleep, or wake in the morning feeling as if they never really slept at all. They are one of the approximately 80 million Americans and 14 million Canadians who have some form of sleep disorder. Is this you?

“The key to every man is his thought. He can only be reformed by showing him a new idea which commands his own.” (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

If you think back to your childhood, you may realize how easy it is for a child to become labelled, slotted into a category, which often becomes self-fulfilling. This child is athletic and strong. This one is a dreamer. This one is creative and artistic. This child is shy, this one outgoing.  This one is smart, this one not so much. Looking back, I think I labelled myself very early as being more cerebral than physical.

“Aging is not “lost youth” but a new stage of opportunity and strength" (Betty Friedan 1921 - 2006)

When was  the moment when you realized that you no longer felt young and invincible? Was it turning 60 or 65? Suddenly overnight you are a “senior”.  You get lower priced tickets at the cinema, cheaper fares on transit but those television commercials about drugs for arthritis, high blood pressure, dementia ... you realize that they are directed at you.

Whether we are inhaling the aromas of curry with spices like cardamom, cumin and coriander, or tasting a pasta sauce rich with rosemary, basil and oregano,  generally we simply enjoy the taste and smell food sensations. But although the word spice evokes the concept of piquant flavors and aromas of foods or drinks,  most of us don’t think of the ways in which these different herbs and spices may be altering our metabolism or have a medicinal effect. 

I especially love the dancing when cruising on the Cunard ships, Queen Mary 2, Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria. All three have beautiful ballrooms, called the Queen's Room. On several of my Cunard cruises, most recently a two-way transatlantic cruise on QM2, the cruise director has hosted Sequence Dance sessions in the Queens Room. I badly wanted to join in but not knowing any of the patterns, I had to sit and watch. Sitting still while dance music is playing is hard for me so I vowed  to learn these dances so I could participate in the future.

As an urbanite living in Vancouver’s increasingly  dense downtown core, I have watched with increasing dismay, as housing prices and rents have sky-rocketed and rental vacancies have become rare as unicorns. Traffic congestion is appalling, little used bike lanes impede traffic flow while cyclists ride aggressively in streets one or two further over that do not have designated bike lanes. And we are told that the geniuses at City Hall are still planning to get rid of two of the busiest routes for entry and exit from the downtown core, the Dunsmuir viaduct and the Howe street on-ramp to the Granville bridge. 

One of my guilty pleasures, indulged in only when I know for sure that I will not be out dancing cheek to cheek, is to munch on a chunk of Dutch Cantenaar cheese topped with a scallion or spring onion. Another is to slather  toasted dark rye bread with my special butter/olive oil spread, and when the butter has soaked into the toast, smear on a layer of German Cambazola cheese.  While the cheese and onion doesn't really pair well with wine, my rye and Cambazola toast tastes wonderful with a glass of Gewurtztraminer or Riesling.

For the summer holidays. my grand-daughter CJ was enrolled in a summer camp program called College For Kids at a local community college. Among the range of courses including languages, design, art, theatre  sports and more, for her first two weeks  she chose robotics, theatre improv and a class with the intriguing title,  "Future Millionaires and Junior Entrepreneurs". 

This was my first time back to the A to Z Challenge since I completed it in 2012. I chose for my theme, to revisit my Amazon River Cruise  through the Peruvian Jungle in 2013 which I had partly documented on my return -  here is a post that showed the excursions during this journey - taking the opportunity to add more information  and details.

The entire crew from the Captain to the kitchen staff came out to be introduced and thanked by us all, and each of the guests was presented with a certificate showing that we had completed our week on the Amazon River.

Xenopus is a genus of clawed aquatic frogs native to sub-Saharan Africa. There are about twenty known species in this genus. I first made the acquaintance of Xenopus Laevus, the best known celebrity of this family, in zoology, in my first year at medical school. At that time the primary laboratory investigations that we carried out were simple dissections.  It was in zoology class that I realized that I was far too squeamish to be a surgeon. 

Near  the confluence of the Marañon and Ucayalli Rivers we traveled by motorized skiff to a  sheltered lagoon area to see giant water lilies. It was at times a rather hair-raising trip through thick water weeds that fouled up the motor of the skiff but the sight of the water lilies was worth it. At least it was for the passengers who sat and watched while the guides had to repeatedly climb out of the boat and get into the water to slash away weeds so the boat could move though the undergrowth and access the lagoon.

There are several villages in the area we visited, where the local riberenos of the Pacama tribe live on the banks of the Amazon river. The guides  try to schedule visits to different villages for their various tour groups. We visited the Pacama Village on the Nahuapa River.

A selection of photographs to show dusk to evening on the Amazon.

After alternately sweltering and scratching in the oven-like tent structures of the Kapok Camp, not to mention my pee-in-the-bottle incident (see K: Kapok Camp in the Peruvian Jungle), my tiny bathroom back on board La Turmalina, with its flush toilet and walk-in shower felt like a luxury hotel to me. Here is a more detailed description.

TEDx StanleyPark 2015 is coming up fast. It will be held at the Granville Island Stage, 1585 Johnston St., Granville Island on May 23rd from 10am – 6pm, with an after party 6 – 8pm. About 450 people are expected to attend.

As I confessed with a degree of hyperbole in my first entry A: Amazon Jungle Adventure - why?, "heat and humidity, bugs and butterflies, moths and mosquitoes rank far below the bottom of my list of favorite things, while comfortable beds, hot showers, flush toilets  and temperate insect-free environments place way over the top".

Deforestation and loss of species in the rainforests of the Amazon Basin is something of which I was vaguely aware but never made it to the forefront of my consciousness.

Before  flying to Iquitos and embarking on the Amazon River cruise, we had two evenings in Lima, capital city of Peru, to explore Peruvian fine dining cuisine. Driving in to the city from the airport, my attention was caught by a striking structure jutting our into the sea. Our driver informed us that this was a restaurant, La Rosa Nautica.

On board, breakfast and lunch were usually buffet style meals while at night, dinner was a more formal affair with  a server taking your order from a printed menu.

La Turmalina served as our home base as we cruised along the major rivers but as well smaller modes of water transport were used so that we could enter narrow, overgrown streams of water and get to  lagoons where we could observe the catfish farming practices of the river -side dwellers.

On our exploratory hike to the jungle camp (see J: Jungle Walk to the Kapok Camp) our guide cracked open a pod which contained a mass of grubs. He challenged us to eat one after telling us of the protective effect against gastrointestinal upsets.

During our week-long journey on the waters of the Peruvian Amazon on the river boat, La Turmalina, each evening our group was treated to musical entertainment by members of the boat crew. They sang and played a variety of  wind, string and percussion instruments, and also played a diverse range of music. None of them were professional musicians but their joy and delight in sharing their music with us was palpable and made it special for us.

Estimates of the population of Peru that is of indigenous origin range between 30 and 45%. About 2% of this group, over 65 different ethnic groups within 16 different language families, live in the area of the Amazon basin.

The Kapok Camp gets its name from the tall surrounding trees. Kapok, the common name for the tall Ceiba Pentandra tree,  native to Mexico, Central and northern South America, is better known for the fibre that is harvested from the seed pods. Kapok fibre has been widely used instead of down as a filling in pillows or mattresses. Liquid from the boiled bark of the kapok tree has been used as a diuretic and aphrodisiac.

One of the advertised highlights of this Amazon River exploration was the opportunity to camp overnight in the  jungle.  Since I am not a hardy out-door type by nature, and camping is not my preferred travel accommodation, I was not so sure that I would feel safe in a jungle tent. During my pre-trip reading I seriously considered taking the offered alternate option of returning to overnight on the boat.

From the time we were met at the airport in Iquitos and taken to our coach for the ride to Nauta, we were in the capable and highly organized hands of the naturalist team who were leading our Amazon explorations.

I love the jewel names, amethyst, tourmaline, emerald and aquamarine, given to this group of riverboats. La Turmalina, the ship on which we traveled is part of a fleet of four, built in the ship yard in Iquitos in the style of 19th century river boats. La Amatista and La Turmalina can take 30 passengers and  La Esmeralda and La Aquamarina can take 17 and 24 passengers respectively. La Turmalina, our expedition riverboat is registered in Peru and operated by English speaking Peruvian Officers and crew.

From Lima airport a direct flight on LAN Airway  took us into Iquitos, Capital of the Peruvian Amazon. Iquitos, with a population of just under 500,00, is the largest city of the Peruvian Amazon rainforest and the sixth largest city in Peru. It has the dubious distinction of being the largest city in the world that is inaccessible by road, other than the 100 km road between Iquitos and Nauta, on the Amazon River. The main way to reach Iquitos is by air or by boat.

As I was traveling with someone from California  we determined after much on-line searching that the most cost-effective way to get to Lima, the capital of Peru, was a LAN Peru Airways direct flight from Los Angeles Airport to  Lima International Airport - Jorge Chávez. The direct flight is about 9 hours. Our flight left at at 9:15 in the evening and got us into Lima at 8:50 the next morning. Peru is 2 hours ahead of Pacific Standard Time.

The Amazon river is the second only to the Nile as the longest river in the world, stretching 6296 kilometers from its origins high in the Andes Mountains of Peru, Ecuador and Columbia. The Amazon runs through Peru and Brazil  to its mouth in the Atlantic Ocean near Belém in Northern Brazil. Although second in length,  it carries more water than any other river including the Nile, and is responsible for 20% of the fresh water carried into the oceans, more than the next seven largest rivers combined.

One of the things that can ruin a great vacation is traveler's diarrhea. And when going to countries where enteric diseases such as typhoid and E. Coli are even more common causes of travelers' diarrhea than salmonella and campylobacter, it makes sense to do all you can to avoid getting sick.

The most perfectly planned travel can be ruined by an unanticipated illness or injury. Obsessive as I am I found it absolutely essential to check out all possible health precautions so I would not "check out" on my jungle trip.

Bet you are wondering about the dance shoes. Dance shoes - in the Amazon jungle? Well read on!

One of my sensible and pragmatic daughters-in-law, on hearing my plan to cruise the Amazon River through the Peruvian jungle,  looked at me bemused and said "why?"