Skip to content

Peruvian Jungle

night falls on the Amazon

A To Z Challenge 2015This was my first time back to the A to ZChallenge since I completed it in 2012. I chose for my theme, to revisit my Amazon River Cruise  through the Peruvian Jungle in 2013 which I had partly documented on my return -  here is a post that showed the excursions during this journey - taking the opportunity to add more information  and details.

This was post A. Amazon Jungle Adventure- Why?

I learned a lot...

Giant water lillies of the Amazon

Near  the confluence of the Marañon and Ucayalli Rivers we traveled by motorized skiff to a  sheltered lagoon area to see giant water lilies. It was at times a rather hair-raising trip through thick water weeds that fouled up the motor of the skiff but the sight of the water lilies was worth it.

At least it was for the passengers who sat and watched while the guides had to repeatedly climb out of the boat and get into the water to slash away weeds so the boat could move though the undergrowth and access the lagoon....

interior of my cabin

After alternately sweltering and scratching in the oven-like tent structures of the Kapok Camp, not to mention my pee-in-the-bottle incident (see K: Kapok Camp in the Peruvian Jungle), my tiny bathroom back on board La Turmalina, with its flush toilet and walk-in shower felt like a luxury hotel to me. Here is a more detailed description.

Suspension bridge for traversing dense jungle territory

One of the advertised highlights of this Amazon River exploration was the opportunity to camp overnight in the  jungle.  Since I am not a hardy out-door type by nature, and camping is not my preferred travel accommodation, I was not so sure that I would feel safe in a jungle tent. During my pre-trip reading I seriously considered taking the offered alternate option of returning to overnight on the boat.

But when the day arrived, I thought that it would be the height of insanity to travel to the Amazon jungle and let my fear of biting insects, scorpions, mosquitos,...

hoatzin

From the time we were met at the airport in Iquitos and taken to our coach for the ride to Nauta, we were in the capable and highly organized hands of the naturalist team who were leading our Amazon explorations.

In my professional career I have encountered many people who were experts in their field, but the visual acuity and speed of Juan-Carlos Palomino and Robinson Rodriguez made an indelible impression on me.  How they could spot a tiny black dot high in a tree as we were speeding down river in our motorized skiff, and instantly identify the type of

...
Approaching La Turmalina, our riverboat

I love the jewel names, amethyst, tourmaline, emerald and aquamarine, given to this group of riverboats. La Turmalina, the ship on which we traveled is part of a fleet of four, built in the ship yard in Iquitos in the style of 19th century river boats. La Amatista and La Turmalina can take 30 passengers and the La Esmeralda and La Aquamarina can take 17 and 24 passengers respectively. La Turmalina, our expedition riverboat is registered in Peru and operated by English speaking Peruvian Officers and crew. There can be up to 14 crew members on board for a full...

A festive day in Nauta on the Amazon River
From Lima airport a direct flight on LAN Airway  took us into Iquitos, Capital of the Peruvian Amazon. Iquitos, with a population of just under 500,00, is the largest city of the Amazon rainforest and the sixth largest city in Peru. It has the dubious distinction of being the largest city in the world that is inaccessible by road, other than the 100 km road between Iquitos and Nauta, on the Amazon River. The main way to reach Iquitos is by air or by boat.
 
LAN at the Iquitos airport

As I was traveling with someone from California  we determined after much on-line searching that the most cost-effective way to get to Lima, the capital of Peru, was a LAN Airways direct flight from Los Angeles Airport to  Lima International Airport - Jorge Chávez. The direct flight is about 9 hours. Our flight left at at 9:15 in the evening and got us into Lima at 8:50 the next morning. Peru is 2 hours ahead of Pacific Standard Time. I liked the idea of an overnight flight but I am one of those people who does not really sleep on...

Dusk on the Amazon River
The Amazon river is the second only to the Nile as the longest river in the world, stretching 6296 kilometers from its origins high in the Andes Mountains of Peru, Ecuador and Columbia to its mouth in the Atlantic Ocean. However it carries more water than any other river including the Nile, and is responsible for 20% of the fresh water carried into the oceans, more than the next seven largest rivers combined.
The confluence of the Maranon and Ucayali rivers is the area usually considered the start of the Amazon River proper, which runs through Peru and Brazil. Some of the tributaries...
I took Dukoral

One of the things that can ruin a great vacation is traveler's diarrhea. And when going to countries where enteric diseases such as typhoid and E. Coli are even more common causes of traveler's diarrhea than salmonella and campylobacter, it makes sense to do all you can to avoid getting sick.

As well as obvious advice about frequent hand washing and not drinking tap water, our information sheet contained a stern warning about not eating food from street vendors as you can't trust the sanitation of the preparations. I am not normally that adventurous in foreign countries so that made...

Pages

Subscribe to Peruvian Jungle