Sipping & Supping

lobster cevicheHaru
205 West 43rd Street,
New York, NY
Ph: (212) -398 9810 or Reserve Online

Haru is so conveniently located for pre-theatre meals, particularly round the Times Square theatre district, that on this trip I actually dined there twice. 

the ebi and vegtable tempuraOn the first visit we were seated at a table in the window alcove. I liked that as it was  a bit secluded from the main activity in the restaurant.

We had just come from seeing Bob, a SITI Company production, and after dinner we were going to see Mary Poppins just around the corner at the New Amsterdam Theatre. With seeing two such different genres of theatre in one day there was so much food for thought that real food initially took second place to conversation.

the spicy roll combination platterInakaya
620 8th Avenue,
New York, NY
Ph: (212) 354-2195 or Reserve Online

Inakaya on Urbanspoon

the chef uses a paddle to reach over the barThis was my first day in Manhattan on this trip, having arrived really late the previous evening.  I met my son to get a number of shopping tasks done. On our way from my hotel we passed Inakaya, and decided to stop in for lunch. The place was full but there was room at the sushi bar.

the salmon, yellowtail and eel combination roll platterI liked the design of the restaurant. It is open with high ceilings and an unusually wide and comfortable sushi bar. As you can the chef has to use a paddle to hand dishes or a bottle of sake across to the patron.

Since this restaurant's specialty is Robata, Japanese barbecue, we had to try one of their Robata dishes so we chose to share one of their specials for the day: the US Kobe Beef duo featuring sirloin and tenderloin on skewers. The meat was incredibly tender and the dish came with grilled vegetables.

charcuterie platterAlobar
46-42 Vernon Blvd,
Long Island City, NY
Ph: (718)  752-6000 or Reserve Online

Alobar on Urbanspoon

octopus saladAfter finishing up our shopping in Manhattan we caught the 7 train across to Long Island City. For dinner we decided to try one of the nearby restaurants that had been on my son's "to visit list."

We decided to share a salad, and then also share a large charcuterie and large cheese platter.cheese platter

After some debate we decided to try the evening's special salad of grilled octopus with shaved lardon on a bed of arugula with pine nuts and a malt vinegar and olive oil dressing. We enjoyed the salad though the dressing was not especially exciting.

Les Rolottes early eveningOne food experience we did not want to miss was a visit to Les Roulottes – the Papeete Food Night Market.  Street food dining has taken on a new flavour so to speak, in many cities including Vancouver.  From the days when street food meant only hotdogs, pizza or pretzels, the street cart program at least in Vancouver has encouraged a varied “gourmet” street dining experience  with carts at different locations throughout the city (Vancouver Foodie Tours Tastes Curbside Kitchen Food).

Papeete has its Roulottes. These are like the street carts we see in Vancouver but they are located in a large market area near the cruise terminal. There are tables to sit at and enjoy your meal.  The vendor who was recommended to us was said to serve "restaurant quality" foods.

the foie gras parfaitHawksworth Restaurant
801 West Georgia St.,
Vancouver, BC
Ph: (604) 673 - 7000 or Reserve Online

Hawksworth on Urbanspoon

slow cooked short ribsBefore going to see La Cage aux Folles at the Vancouver Playhouse, I was invited to dinner at Hawksworth. Although it had been on my "must visit" list for a while, this was my first opportunity to dine here and I was looking forward to it.

We both decided on appetizers and an entree, self-righteously planning on not having dessert. Although that plan did not last much past our first look at the dessert menu. 

Ruby's fish and shrimp comboA Deemers burger with extra avocadoEating out with a hungry toddler and pre-schooler can be challenging but in the many mini-cities of south Orange County there are plenty of diners where a "terrible-two's" unpredictable behaviour raises no eyebrows. On this short trip   I had occasion to try out two  kid friendly places; Ruby's Diner, a regular favorite for the kids, and Deemer's American Grill, to which we had never previously been.

Ruby's Diner Laguna Hills
24155 Laguna Hills Mall
Laguna Hills, CA 92653
Ph: 949-588-7829

bluecheese pear tarts with red wine syrupWatermarc Restaurant
448  S. Coast Hwy.,
Laguna Beach, CA
Ph: (949] 376-62 or Reserve Online at OpenTable

WaterMarc Grill on Urbanspoon

Generally on my visits to Orange County my culinary explorations with my family tend to be limited to places suitable for taking young children. Unlike my usual dining choices therefore, in California my eating out tends much more toward casual or fast food dining. 

sizzling garlic shrimpSo with the children at school and my son having a rare day off work, we took the opportunity to go for lunch to try some of the finer fare of Orange County.

As one who loves word play, while looking through the array of options for restaurants in this area, my attention was first caught by the name, Watermarc.   I was therefore not surprised to read that the chef-owner is Marc Cohen, of the group that operates OPAH and 230 Forest Avenue.

the fillet mignon pot pie the pot pieWe decided to go for a brisk walk in Laguna Beach followed by lunch at Watermarc which was a few minutes walk up from the beach area. It proved to be an excellent choice. The menu offered a range of dishes from interesting grazing plates to flatbread, burgers or full entrees. My only disappointment was that the foie gras brulee that had caught my eye on the online menu did not seem to be offered at lunch. I would have liked to compare it with the foie gras sundae I had at Ensemble in Vancouver.

A Camembert from Vancouver Island's Natural PasturesOysters, Cheese and Sauces - who knew these things but chefs, fishmongers and dairy people?

Cheese: Our recent tasting of Soft-ripened Bloomy Rind Cheeses prompted questions from our tasters like  "how are Camembert and Brie different anyway?" It was a question that had frequently flitted across my mind, but one that I had never seriously set out to research. So now was the time.

So here goes with some foodie trivia: Without  any books on cheeses in my library, my first visit was the web - but as usual I found conflicting information but this is what I gleaned from my reading.

 The modern day form of both Brie and Camembert that we get in North American s similar in that both are soft ripened and often made with similar bacterial cultures.  The original French Brie has a long history, and was often required as a tribute by the French Kings. Camembert is named after the 18th century Norman village of Camembert, where its originator Marie Harel lived. The name was given to this cheese after Napoleon had enjoyed a sample presented to him by one of Marie's daughters in 1855.

tuna tartare specialSage Bistro at UBC
6331 Crescent Road,Vancouver.
Ph: 604 822-0968

Sage Bistro on Urbanspoon

It has been ages, probably several years, since I had lunch at Sage Bistro. Before I chose to redeploy myself from university professor to  on-line media professional, Sage Bistro was the place of choice for on-campus lunch meetings.

UBC greensI was delighted to be invited to join a friend for lunch at Sage prior to attending a talk and curious to see whether the food was as good as I remembered. Luckily it was. 

Mornay sauce modified  by meOysters, Cheese and Sauces - who knew these things but chefs, fishmongers and dairy people?

On my to-do list of items I had said I would follow up on from previous stories, the second item was Sauces. Way back in April when we were cooking low carb dishes and I made a Mornay sauce to accompany a shrimp dish, I promised to summarize different sauce names for the non-chefs among us who don't remember the difference between Béarnaise and Hollandaise. I had let that promise slip until I was recently reminded of it by a discussion of Hunter's sauce over lunch at Sage Bistro.

So here is foodie trivia: Part II: The main course Sauces. This represents what I have gleaned from a number of different sources (no pun intended); cookbooks, encyclopedias and posts on the net, and Hopefully it is a fairly accurate summary.

With respect to the sauces commonly used in Western cooking it is simple to think of sauces as primary or mother sauces (as classified by French chef Auguste Escoffier) and secondary sauces, made by adding other ingredients to a primary sauce.

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